The Slow Train to Freedom

By: Anna-Marie Cyrus November 4th, 1845 All aboard the Underground Railroad! Hang on, that’s not quite right. The Underground Railroad? Yes. Underground? No. A railroad with a train? No. So then, what is it? The Underground Railroad is supposedly a vast network of safe houses, predominately black abolitionists and routes, that leads runaway slaves to…

A Desperate Plea for a Divine Plan

August 19, 1850: By Jonas Johnston Washington, D.C.- The American Colonization Society, which founded Liberia in 1830 with the assistance of our good President James Monroe1, has recently put out a request for the people of the United States to raise twenty thousand dollars in a fundraising attempt to buy and establish a series of…

A Reflection on the Cotton Economy

December 21, 1850 Through my 50 years of journalism, I have been present for the rise of the cotton industry. When I first began my writing, cotton was rarely present in southern farms, dominated by unstable crops such as tobacco and rice. These crops were either horribly unreliable, with constantly fluctuating prices (tobacco) or unfortunately…

American Mexican War Reflection

October 17, 18450 As the United States have grown tremendously, through immigration and nativity, they have ran into many issues regarding expansion. The Louisiana Purchase of 1803 provided hundreds of thousands of square miles to accommodate the rapid growth of the United States population. This new land inspired many people, like myself, to take advantage…

Nunna daul Tsuny – The Trail of Tears

Baltimore Sun – August 1839 By Roman Ramsey John Ross was elected chief of the Cherokee Nation today in Oklahoma, their new homeland (6). The events that lead up to this election in the west were as follows. As you may remember, the removal of the Indians began nine years ago, with the Indian Removal…

The South’s Reception of the Compromise of 1850

September 18, 1850 It is a warm morning in Charleston, South Carolina and the bustle of people through the city streets is excited with the anticipation of long-awaited news. I sit on a decorative wrought-iron bench on the sidewalk outside the Charleston Morning Post’s office. It is not yet even six o’clock in the morning…

Cotton is King

August 28, 1849 Welcome to the age of King Cotton. There is an air of excitement and joy in the south as cotton production has become a major export for America, booming the southern economy. Nearly all new farmers in the south are producing short-staple cotton. This dramatic shift comes after an age of unreliable…

The Life of Eli Whitney

January 12, 1825 4 days ago, the United States lost a key figure in modern agriculture and production. Eli Whitney, born in 1765, was an “inventor, engineer, husband, and father“. He is survived by a wife and seven children. Whitney will be remembered for his ingenious inventions, including interchangeable parts and the cotton gin. The…

Suicide Under Slavery & Trust in God

November 11, 1835 “I hope that my death would leave God thinking something is wrong down here” Annie Coley said it with her teary eyes. Although vast number of slaves successfully escaped from their masters, it was different in Coley’s case.[1] Two weeks ago, she ran away from her slave owner in Virginia, hoping to…

The Execution of Nat Turner

November 11, 1831 Today will go down in history as an important day in upholding the dignity of the fine people of the South. Today the good will triumph over the sinful, the just will triumph over the unjust, and the powerful will triumph over the weak. Today in Jerusalem, Virginia, we will at last…

The Alamo and the Independence of Texas

March 18, 1836 It has been almost 23 years since I last wrote for the Baltimore Sun, and I am honored that they have contacted me in interest of having me write another piece. There are many current affairs in Texas with regards to Mexico and the United States. I have travelled to San Antonio…

Plantation Life in the South

January 31, 1811 At least I could still recognize their faces, but then the work of human flesh began. In the spring of 1811, when I arrived at a large plantation in North Carolina, the slaves were driven to work from sunrise to sunset. The bitterness that individuals suffered frequently showed through their faces and…